jes. aging skate witch. i write things, i play music with people. anticolonial mindset. more dresses in the pit. tuff dude. rare byrd. people's survival is not your theory. labor. pedals. audio engineering. songwriting. tearing the whole rotten thing down. (my old blog was modernistwitchery.tumblr.com - i deleted it and started fresh, if you're wondering why you're not following me and you were before.) here is some more stuff about me, including my face. and if i followed you, please read this regarding my intentions. if you would like to send me a message, you may do so here. this blog is representative of my thoughts only; i do not speak for my employer.


Text

Sep 30, 2014
@ 7:00 pm
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44 notes

There is a dude I know. Some of you know this dude too. Mop of black hair shot through with silver. Eyes unreal blue. Soft lisp, slightly lopsided smile. Hands so big they can nearly wrap around mine.

Nobody will ever come close to matching the light in this dude, not to me. The depth to which they think through things, the consideration they give to others: unparalleled. The way people love them. ‘That’s your partner? Oh my GOD. The best!’ Everyone has a glowing story or five, and for good reason.

This dude. This dude who gets it in ways nobody else does. This dude, this perfect dude who has D. Boon’s heart and Nicki Minaj’s sex appeal and Eddie Pepitone’s sense of humor. The fact that I get to call this dude my other half, that we’ve gotten even these 8 - almost 9 - imperfect difficult years together is something I will never not be grateful for.


Text

Sep 26, 2014
@ 12:03 am
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8 notes

I miss SCS so badly that I just almost started crying into Frankie Teardrop’s fur.


Link

Sep 25, 2014
@ 8:44 pm
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16 notes

How To Book A Show »

A zine by my wonderful friend landspeedrecord on booking shows yrself. Essential, especially given today’s discussion.


Photo

Sep 25, 2014
@ 5:33 pm
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15 notes

This bird is coming to steal your soul (also this record looks cool).

This bird is coming to steal your soul (also this record looks cool).


Link

Sep 25, 2014
@ 3:19 pm
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30 notes

Why did Animal Kingdom have to die? | Music Feature | Chicago Reader »

I’m quoted in this article (talking about Pure Joy and the value of DIY community, not about Animal Kingdom; I actually declined to speak about AK itself because everything I had to say was very critical), and I feel the need to qualify some things about how I feel about other portions of this article lest I be misinterpreted (through no fault of Leor’s).

I believe DIY spaces, legal or illegal, should be active parts of their neighborhood communities. If you’re a ‘party house,’ it’s your responsibility to let neighbors know beforehand when shows are happening and to be respectful of their space - not have shows outside at a late hour. I know many people who live in sustainable DIY spaces and have over the last 20 years, and you make those things work by inviting neighbors in - inviting them over for afternoon picnics and potlucks, offering them community meeting space to organize or have groups meet in for no cost if necessary (this last bit is a huge part of Pure Joy’s mission).

I am completely appalled at the idea mentioned in the article of what seems like paying your neighbors off (I truly hope this was miscommunicated somehow) for not calling the cops on your show, and I am even more appalled at the statement Kelly makes about not being pushed to Garfield Park. Garfield Park is an amazing community - one that has its struggles with drugs and violence, as any community dealing with systemic poverty and racism does, especially in Chicago right now. I have done a lot of work with community organizations in Garfield Park and have found it to be a really welcoming community with a lot of people who are doing everything they can to make their neighborhood a safe and sustainable place to live. Again, I hope this was a statement that was somehow miscommunicated, because it reads as severely racist.

Pure Joy would be proud to be part of any community with such strength. What’s holding us up is that we need a space to be not just affordable but accessible on all fronts - first-floor only, bathrooms that comply with ADA requirements, near public transportation accessible from all sides of the city, so forth.

When I said that people outside the community don’t understand the value of DIY spaces necessarily, I was talking very specifically about bankers (the lending scene for startup nonprofits right now is very dire) and commercial real estate agents who don’t understand why we’re not just a regular venue and we don’t have hundreds of thousands of dollars in the bank/aren’t just out to make money (we are a dry venue with after-school arts programming). If that was not clearly communicated, I truly apologize. When I spoke about illegal spots of a certain size attracting attention, I meant by the media (something cops in this city monitor), not attracting neighborhood attention. Again, if that was not conveyed adequately initially, I am very sorry.

I’m not out to make enemies or alienate anyone or talk shit, but I couldn’t let it stand having my name attached without clarifying some things.


Photo

Sep 24, 2014
@ 11:50 pm
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263 notes

thecoalitionmag:

Hey, bubs!
Our music issue is currently in the works! I’ve had my eye fixated on a music issue since day one and now that it’s finally in the making, i am more excited than ever. This issue is dedicated to highlighting women of colour in music: up and coming artists and those who also paved the way and brought in loud voices, different techniques, and vigor that we still feed off of today. There are so many grrrls of colour today invading the punk scene, grunge scene, etc and not enough acknowledgement given to them. This issue is going to serve as a platform for them. The demonizing of black women in the hip hop industry is becoming a rampant issue. In this issue, we will talk at length about black women in hip hop (and other genres) and highlight our fave songstresses, from back in the day to those who are barging in and making a name for themselves. Not only will we be highlighting artists, but we’ll have reviews, in-depth articles, interviews with the raddest people you will ever meet, playlists to last you the next two years, and much more. 
We need your help to make this issue the biggest one yet and you can help us in two ways. First of all, we are calling all grrrls of colour who want to write, illustrate, or contribute anything to this issue to come through and email us at msgthecoalition@gmail.com. We are also calling on musicians/artists who are on the rise/unknown and want to share their music with us, come thru and email us too! Secondly, in order to bring this issue to life (that’s printing it) we need sufficient funds to print enough copies to sell, not only online, but at your local bookstore or zine shop. We are trying to get our message as far out as possible as we can! Help us by donating to our GoFundMe, any amount counts. Our current goal is $350 and we need to have this issue sent out for printing by the 15th of October. Any and every contribution counts, every reblog and tweet counts!
You can help by spreading this like wildfire too! Let everyone know we’re coming thru with power.
-Fabiola, editor in chief

thecoalitionmag:

Hey, bubs!

Our music issue is currently in the works! I’ve had my eye fixated on a music issue since day one and now that it’s finally in the making, i am more excited than ever. This issue is dedicated to highlighting women of colour in music: up and coming artists and those who also paved the way and brought in loud voices, different techniques, and vigor that we still feed off of today. There are so many grrrls of colour today invading the punk scene, grunge scene, etc and not enough acknowledgement given to them. This issue is going to serve as a platform for them. The demonizing of black women in the hip hop industry is becoming a rampant issue. In this issue, we will talk at length about black women in hip hop (and other genres) and highlight our fave songstresses, from back in the day to those who are barging in and making a name for themselves. Not only will we be highlighting artists, but we’ll have reviews, in-depth articles, interviews with the raddest people you will ever meet, playlists to last you the next two years, and much more. 

We need your help to make this issue the biggest one yet and you can help us in two ways. First of all, we are calling all grrrls of colour who want to write, illustrate, or contribute anything to this issue to come through and email us at msgthecoalition@gmail.com. We are also calling on musicians/artists who are on the rise/unknown and want to share their music with us, come thru and email us too! Secondly, in order to bring this issue to life (that’s printing it) we need sufficient funds to print enough copies to sell, not only online, but at your local bookstore or zine shop. We are trying to get our message as far out as possible as we can! Help us by donating to our GoFundMe, any amount counts. Our current goal is $350 and we need to have this issue sent out for printing by the 15th of October. Any and every contribution counts, every reblog and tweet counts!

You can help by spreading this like wildfire too! Let everyone know we’re coming thru with power.

-Fabiola, editor in chief

(via plantaplanta)


Audio

Sep 24, 2014
@ 9:26 pm
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Played 1,197 times.
168 notes

dylandigits:

hoodfuturism:

acousmata:

"Hydro Theory"
Drexciya

A highly secretive project of Detroit techno musicians James Stinson and Gerald Donald, Drexciya was a concept band based on a constructed Afro-futurist mythology. The duo’s title referred to an imagined underwater civilization inhabited by the descendants of unborn children of African women who were thrown overboard from slave ships crossing the Atlantic. Their music, released primarily on a series of EPs beginning in the early 1990s, explores a shadowy and evocative world of sonic imagery, an alternate reality of techno music in which the genre’s upbeat dancefloor roots are mercilessly deracinated by throbbing waves of dark sonic energy. Drexciya ended with Stinson’s untimely death in 2002, but Donald has continued to produce music under such names as Arpanet and Dopplereffekt.

Source: The Journey Home (1995)

ok but this is life

Essential listening. Most of the drexicya back catalog is out of print but can be found in various places around the Internet. I encourage anyone interested in Afrofuturism to check out other Detroit techno and electro artists such as Jeff Mills, Carl Craig, and the Underground Resistance crew. Above all check out Juan Atkins, who many of us know from the 80s electro classic, cybotron’s “clear”


Text

Sep 24, 2014
@ 9:25 pm
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6 notes

That said, when anger becomes something that moves laterally against other members of your community who are empathetic and often struggling with many of the same things, I am out until we can all sit down and talk through some painful shit without attacking one another immediately.


Text

Sep 24, 2014
@ 9:19 pm
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35 notes

I just read the entirety of that Atlantic article on whether the term cisgender will ever be mainstream, and here is what I have to say:

jerkoff hand motion. Plus fart noise.

Honestly, part of me doesn’t care about queer experiences ever being ‘mainstreamed’. I just want to live my life being the person I am without expecting violence. If that means I am forever on the edges of things, fine.

But I also am annoyed by the idea that the term cisgender is ‘too fraught,’ because the reasons why boil down to a few:
A) I, a cis person, didn’t get to define this term! I am at the center of things and considered normal! This marks my gender as equal to a trans/nonbinary person’s! Oh no!
B) You’re too angry when you use this term. If you are more freaked out by someone’s anger than the reason why they’re angry, scared, defensive: you gotta question yourself.

I am a pretty logical person when it comes to discussing such things and I like to consider multiple perspectives but man:

Jerkoff motion. Plus fart noise. Into infinity.


Audio

Sep 24, 2014
@ 8:54 pm
Permalink
Played 295 times.
80 notes

(Source: nowordsinmymouth, via cheeseburgeryouth)